Sponsored links


Valid XHTML 1.0!
Valid CSS!
Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Enterprise JavaBeans, Fourth Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Richard Monson-Haefel, Bill Burke, Sacha Labourey
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Pretty Good Book.


I really felt this book a good one. Pretty interesting too by using example like Titan Ship Booking he really makes it simple to understand too. Also the author participates in many open source projects too, one which i recently came to know is the EJBoss. He is indeed a very good author.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid
Publisher: Basic Books
Authors: Douglas R. Hofstadter
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
The unison of art, mathematics, computer and mind


Hofstadter has done a original work combining art, mathematics, computer and philosophy. He presents the core similarity between the greatest work of art and mathematic which has a great implication on mind. The book is very readable, enjoyable and interlectual. It is a non-fiction which can be read like a fiction. A great book!!!



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Java Servlet Programming, 2nd Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Jason Hunter
Rating: 4/5
Customer opinion - 4 stars out of 5
Very helpful for first-time servlet programmer


I bought this book because I had just finished reading the Java Black Book and hated it. This was a much more serious and insightful presentation of servlet programming; just what I wanted. The examples are useful, and I was able to build a 100% Java e-commerce Web site using this book alone. The JDBC and session tracking chapters were invaluable.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: The Humane Interface: New Directions for Designing Interactive Systems
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: Jef Raskin
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Revenge On The Nerds


If you have ever been annoyed or perplexed by your computer, you will love "The Humane Interface," by Jef Raskin, the Silicon-Valley iconoclast who created the Macintosh project at Apple.
My first experience with computers came at a party in the mid-'70s when I was dragged into a four-way discussion over the question of how to get past an ogre who was guarding a cave entrance. I had no idea what my three nerdy companions were talking about with such amusement and I felt that they were secretly savoring my confusion. It turned out that they had a computer terminal in the bedroom that was hooked up to M.I.T. through something called the "Internet" and they were playing a game called "Zork." A few years later, these same guys and their nerdy brethren were designing the interfaces that you and I rely upon today and, I felt, they were still secretly savoring our confusion.
As luck would have it, I was drawn into computers by way of the electronic games industry in the '80s. Whenever I complained about the way computers worked, I was driven back and put in my place by technical arguments that made me feel like a Neanderthal. Now I imagine that many of YOU have either been in the same place, or have just accepted -- as you might a bitter medicine --the aggravating complexity of computers as a "given." Well, with the publication of "The Humane Interface," our time has come. It is an easy and amusing read, but it is also a radical critique that just might shake up the computer industry. The attack on the sacred cows of GUI interface design is humorous but devastating, with plenty of supporting scientific data. Once he's definitively proven that the emperor has no clothes, Raskin offers commonsensical, and oftimes ingeniously simple solutions.
I recommend "The Humane Interface" to casual computer users as well as professionals, since it will equip both with the right spells to overcome the ogre of GUI.