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Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: Applying UML and Patterns : An Introduction to Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development (3rd Edition)
Publisher: Prentice Hall PTR
Authors: Craig Larman
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
A good introduction, and more, to OO Analysis and Design


I am in agreement with some of the observations made in the 1-out-of-5 review by wiredweird. However, I am inclined to rate this book a 5 out of 5.
There are a lot of books out there that talk about O-O but stop at inane and condescending examples that limits what knowledge, if any, you could get from the books. On the other side of the spectrum, you have outstanding books like "Design Patterns" that might be a little hard to follow for people like, for instance, me. The uniqueness of this book by Craig Larman is that it effectively bridges the yawning gap between the O-O for idiots approach and the O-O for experts approach. Granted that Mr. Larman seems to be calling "Principles" as "Patterns" -- it is kind of a stretch to call "Polymorphism" a pattern, but nomenclature aside, the emphasis is rightly on general principles that prevade patterns of design. Larman might have stretched the limits of UML notation here and there -- but it is almost always to emphasize an idea.
The main portion of the book deals with a case study involving a POS system -- good choice, a POS system is something we are all familiar with and it offers a lot of possiblities to show the application of design principles and patterns. Its possible that this is not the best book to teach (or to learn) O-O design -- but I havent come across one that is better.
An irritant i have with this book is the quality of the paper used -- it reflects light making it a strain to read it under fluorescent light. Maybe they will fix it in the next edition so that the reader is the only one doing the reflecting.



Product: Book - Hardcover
Title: The Protocols (TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1)
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional
Authors: W. Richard Stevens
Rating: 5/5
Customer opinion - 5 stars out of 5
Best book about TCP/IP ever


Stevens has achieved something that I was searching for; An intense, simple and essential Illustration of TCP/IP. I am currently writing a FireWall and this book was the first step I had to take into this networking world. I still use it as my primary reference book.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: Web Database Applications with PHP & MySQL, 2nd Edition
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Hugh E. Williams
Rating: 3/5
Customer opinion - 3 stars out of 5
Great beginning to end, but still not The Bible


I have to agree with Dave Hilton's review. I love PHP, MySQL and ORA, but as good as this book was to give you a beginning to end HOW TO of creating a database backed web site with the two, it's far from a definitive guide. I'm still waiting for a Canonical PHP book and definitely for a decent MySQL book. There really isn't anything in this book you can't learn from PHP.net, MySQL.org and DevShed, but if you want a nice and compact "course" type book, this one will do. You'll still need to reference PHP.net.
Unfortunately, after taking a Database Design class in Oracle, I've become a lot more aware of MySQL's limitations. Yes, it's free, but postgreSQL may be a better choice if some of MySQL's lacking features aren't added in the next version.



Product: Book - Paperback
Title: SQL Pocket Guide
Publisher: O'Reilly
Authors: Jonathan Gennick
Rating: 3/5
Customer opinion - 3 stars out of 5
Great, but not what I was looking for.


First: The signal to noise ratio in this book is wonderful. There's a vast amount of information packed into this little volume.
Second: A significant portion of it has to do with interoperability between database vendors, the differences in syntactic sugar between Oracle/DB2/SQL Server & MySql really don't interest me all that much.
Third: There is nary a word in here about DDL. Nothing on creating/dropping tables, indices & keys, views, databases.
Fourth: Nor is there any treatment on user access (granting permissions, etc.)
Fifth: Selects/Joins/updates/deletes, etc. Are all very thoroughly covered.
These are all things I expect a "SQL Pocket Guide" to have. Instead this is more of a "SQL Interoperability Guide".
Conclusion? This is a great little book if you are not a DBA and never take on the role of one.